Brian McCardie: Actor's cause of death revealed by sister

Line of Duty and Rob Roy actor Brian McCardie, who died aged 59. Photo: Grant Keelan/BBC/PA WireLine of Duty and Rob Roy actor Brian McCardie, who died aged 59. Photo: Grant Keelan/BBC/PA Wire
Line of Duty and Rob Roy actor Brian McCardie, who died aged 59. Photo: Grant Keelan/BBC/PA Wire
The cause of death of Line of Duty actor Brian McCardie has been revealed

An actor’s sister has revealed what caused his death last month.

Brian McCardie was known for playing Tommy Hunter in police drama Line of Duty, as well as roles in Rob Roy, Time, and many other dramas.

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His death on April 28 came as a shock, as he was aged only 59. Now his sister Sarah, posting on X (formerly Twitter) has revealed the cause.

She wrote: “The McCardie family would like to thank everyone for their overwhelming support regarding the sudden passing of Brian James McCardie - beloved son, brother, uncle & friend. Brian died due to an aortic dissection, causing short pain and a sudden death.”

She also revealed that a funeral mass will be held on Thursday (May 23) at St Mary’s Church, 70 Bannatyne Street, Lanark at 11.30am, with a 1.30pm ceremony at Holytown Cremetorium, Memorial Way, Holytown, Motherwell ML1 5RU where mourners “will celebrate Brian's life before he takes his final bow”.

Sarah added: “There will be links available to both the mass & the cremation service for those who cannot attend in person - we will feel your support from afar. With love & thanks, The McCardie family - Eddie, Moira, Martin, Ed, Liz & Sarah. Xxx”

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The British Heart Foundation says that aortic dissection “is when the weakened wall of the aorta tears, causing blood to leak between the layers that make up the walls of your arteries. This can happen suddenly or slowly over time.”

The charity says symptoms of aortic dissection include a sudden, severe pain across the chest, often felt in the back or between the shoulder blades, pain in the jaw, face, abdomen, back or lower extremities, feeling cold, clammy and sweaty, fainting and shortness of breath.

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