One cup of tea a day could reduce risk of diabetes, new study suggests

Drinking tea comes with numerous health benefits. (Picture: Adobe Stock)Drinking tea comes with numerous health benefits. (Picture: Adobe Stock)
Drinking tea comes with numerous health benefits. (Picture: Adobe Stock) | Adobe Stock
But there is a catch...

Just one cup of tea each day could help Brits to fight off diabetes, a new study suggests.

New research from a university in Australia has claimed that daily tea drinkers can reduce their chances of developing type two diabetes by almost 30 per cent.

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Drinking tea comes with numerous health benefits. (Picture: Adobe Stock)Drinking tea comes with numerous health benefits. (Picture: Adobe Stock)
Drinking tea comes with numerous health benefits. (Picture: Adobe Stock) | Adobe Stock

Professor Tongzhi Wu from Adelaide University said: “Our findings hint at the protective effects of habitual tea drinking on blood sugar management.” The expert added: "The substantial health benefits of tea, including a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and type two diabetes, have been reported in several studies over recent years, but the mechanisms underlying these benefits have been unclear.

"Our findings hint at the protective effects of habitual tea drinking on blood sugar management via increased glucose excretion in urine, improved insulin resistance and thus better control of blood sugar. These benefits were most pronounced among daily dark tea drinkers.”

The catch with this study is that for the effects of the tea to be the most effective, Brits must drink "dark" tea - which means no milk. However, substitutes like oat milk and almond milk will not have a siginificant negative impact.

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