Inquest into 11-year-old boy who died after taking part in dangerous 'chroming' social media craze

Tommie-lee Gracie Billington, 11, died on a sleepover at a house in Greenset Close in Lancaster, Lancashire on Saturday, March 2Tommie-lee Gracie Billington, 11, died on a sleepover at a house in Greenset Close in Lancaster, Lancashire on Saturday, March 2
Tommie-lee Gracie Billington, 11, died on a sleepover at a house in Greenset Close in Lancaster, Lancashire on Saturday, March 2 | Tina Brown (grandmother)
Tommie-lee Gracie Billington died on Saturday, March 2 after he was found unresponsive at a friend's home in Lancaster - his family believe he was taking part in a dangerous social media craze, known by some as chroming

An inquest into the death of an 11-year-old boy who died after taking part in a dangerous social media craze has opened in Preston.

Tommie-lee Gracie Billington died on Saturday, March 2 after he was found unresponsive at a friend's home in Greenset Close, Lancaster.

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His grandmother Tina Brown, who lives in South Ribble, said that her grandson suffered a suspected cardiac arrest at around 12.45pm and was rushed to hospital. Sadly, paramedics were unable to save him.

She has said: "I will make sure to the best of my ability that your name and your beautiful face will become the reason that other children's lives will be saved."

Lancashire Police said his death is currently 'unexplained' and an investigation is ongoing, but his grandmother said the boy lost consciousness after sniffing or inhaling toxic fumes.

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Today at Preston Coroners Court, area coroner Kate Bissett confirmed there were no suspicious circumstances in the youngster's death.

The boy's family did not attend the hearing, which was briefly opened and then adjourned until June 6. A GoFundMe set up by a family friend to help with funeral costs has raised more than £4,000. You can donate here.

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