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Rosie Jones ‘baby bump’: comedian’s pregnancy pic on Casualty explained - and response to ‘abhorrent abuse’

The 31-year-old comedian called for an end to ‘ableist abuse’ and ‘online hate’

British comedian Rosie Jones has spoken out about the “abhorrent abuse” she received after posting a photo of herself on Instagram with a baby bump.

The 31-year-old said that vile messages are an “unfortunately regular occurrence” for her.

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This is everything you need to know.

Who is Rosie Jones?

Jones is a British comedian and actress, who was born on 24 June 1990. After graduating with a degree from the University of Huddersfield, Jones was hired for a year as a junior researcher for Objective Media Group.

In January 2015, she attended a screenwriting class at the National Film and Television School, and the following year she reached the final of the 2016 Funny Women Awards.

Jones has written for panel shows like The Last Leg during its coverage of the 2016 Summer Olympics, Harry Hill’s Alien Fun Capsule, Would I Lie to You? and 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown.

Throughout her career, Jones has also appeared on shows including 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown, Silent Witness, The Last Leg, Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators, Joe Lycett’s Got Your Back, Question Time, QI and more.

Rosie Jones with The Last Leg host Adam Hills at the National Lottery’s Paralympics GB Homecoming (Photo: Ian Gavan/Getty Images for The National Lottery)

In 2019, Jones launched a podcast alongside fellow comedian Helen Bauer, called Daddy Look at Me, and in 2020 she co-wrote episode four of the second season of the Netflix series Sex Education.

In 2021, Jones starred in her own Channel 4 series, called Trip Hazard: My Great British Adventure, which was filmed during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Jones is also known for her standup comedy as well, having performed at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2017 and 2018. Also in 2018, she performed at the Greenwich Comedy Festival, and in 2019 performed during Spectacular, a one-off event for Comic Relief. She has also been a support act for Nish Kumar.

She also wrote her own book, launched in April 2021, called The Amazing Edie Eckhart.

Jones has ataxic cerebral palsy, something which she incorporates into her comedy. In interviews, Jones has spoken before about how she hopes her presence as a disabled person on TV might inspire others with disabilities.

Speaking to the Guardian in 2021, Jones said: “I would love in the next few years to see more disabled comedians, directors, producers, commissioners.

“I hope disabled people can see me on TV and think: if she can do it, I can do it.”

Is she pregnant?

After Jones appeared on Casualty, she posted a picture of herself to Instagram sporting a very prominent baby bump.

In the caption she wrote: “Thank you so much for all the lovely messages about my appearance on Casualty last night. Here’s some hot backstage content of me with my bump!

“Unfortunately the BBC canteen didn’t give me double dinner portions even though I insisted that I was eating for two.”

Despite the rather convincing pregnancy belly that left some sure she really was pregnant, Jones is not actually pregnant.

Her prosthetic pregnancy belly was part of her storyline on Casualty as the character of Paula Kettering, whom Jones first appeared as in February 2021.

What was said about the photo - and how did she respond?

After Jones shared the photo of herself with the fake bump, many took to congratulate the actress on her performance in Casualty.

However, not all the comments were supportive, with trolls leaving abusive messages on the Instagram post.

Jones shared one of the comments on Twitter, which assumed that she was actually pregnant.

It read: “Oh god that baby is going to come out r****ded just like its mom good lord who would s***w you.”

Posting a screenshot of the comment on Twitter, Jones tweeted: “Just received this Insta comment. Although messages like this are an unfortunately regular occurrence for me, I still don’t understand how people are so full of hate they think it’s ok to write this kind of abhorrent abuse.

“Stop ableist abuse. Stop hate online. Stop all of this.”

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