Lewis Capaldi admits he suffers bouts of ‘imposter syndrome’ as he continues to battle Tourette's on tour

Lewis Capaldi can look to the likes of Ryan Reynolds and Meryl Streep for help combatting his bouts of imposter syndrome.
Lewis Capaldi attends The BRIT Awards 2023  at The O2 Arena on February 11, 2023 in London, England. (Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)Lewis Capaldi attends The BRIT Awards 2023  at The O2 Arena on February 11, 2023 in London, England. (Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)
Lewis Capaldi attends The BRIT Awards 2023 at The O2 Arena on February 11, 2023 in London, England. (Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

Lovable larrikin Lewis Capaldi to many has the world at his feet; a successful musician, making money doing what he loves, with a huge fan base and a clutch of awards and hit singles under his belt. Yet the waters are hardly smooth for the good ship Lewis, as he continues to battle with a Tourette's affliction that could see the 26-year-old forced to retire from live performances and now, in an interview with The S*n, a number of cases of imposter syndrome. 

It is certainly a syndrome that many of us have felt at some stage during our lives, that feeling that you shouldn’t really be in a job or a location because you don’t belong in that situation. A number of celebrities have opened up about dealing with imposter phenomenon, which is not a mental ailment but instead a common experience that can affect individuals in various domains of life, including work, academics, and personal relationships. It is often associated with perfectionism, anxiety, and low self-esteem.

Ryan Reynolds in an interview with the New York Times shared that he often feels like a "fraud" and that he worries about being exposed as "a charlatan." He revealed that his imposter syndrome stems from the fact that he has been lucky in his career, and he worries that he does not deserve his success. You can also count on the likes of Emma Watson, Tom Hanks, Michelle Obama, Kate Winslet and even the great Meryl Streep as celebrities who have been open with their attacks of imposter syndrome. 

Which puts the humble Capaldi in good company, as he explained in particular his bouts when attending red carpet ceremonies. "I was at the Brits recently,” explaining his experience with The S*n, “I got out of the car and a load of kids are hanging out with cameras and I suddenly start telling myself, 'Oh, it's not for me, they don't want my picture, they're waiting for Harry Styles.' It's impostor syndrome, and it's a very real thing for me. It's wild, but the documentary really triggered that."

The documentary in particular, which he’s recently admitted has slightly embarrassed him, is the Netflix original “How I'm Feeling Now,” and in particular a moment when cameras followed him into his local, the Tennant's Bar in Glasgow, making him feel uncomfortable. “Fame in general is quite embarrassing. I had to come in here, in this pub, once with the cameras and I was so mortified. If I was watching on I'd have just been like, 'What a k*** head - he's changed.”

What is imposter syndrome?

Imposter syndrome is a psychological pattern where an individual doubts their abilities and fears being exposed as a fraud, despite evidence of their competence and achievements. People with imposter syndrome often feel like they do not deserve their success or accomplishments and that they have somehow tricked others into thinking they are more skilled or talented than they actually are.

Imposter syndrome can manifest in various ways, including perfectionism, overworking, self-doubt, and anxiety. It can affect anyone, regardless of their age, gender, or profession, and it is more common than people may think.

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