Green tea could reduce risk of dementia, University of Leeds study claims

Doctors say you'd have to drink three cups of green tea a day to get the full effects.
Green tea could lower your risk of dementia - if you drink at least three cups a day. (Picture: Adobe Stock)Green tea could lower your risk of dementia - if you drink at least three cups a day. (Picture: Adobe Stock)
Green tea could lower your risk of dementia - if you drink at least three cups a day. (Picture: Adobe Stock)

Drinking a unique type of tea could be the key to reducing your risk of dementia, according to experts.

A study conducted at the University of Leeds has concluded that drinking green tea on a regular basis can not only improve your brain power, but also lower your chances of getting dementia later on in life. This is due to a chemical compound found exclusively in green tea.

The compound, called epigallocatechin gallate (EPCG) can break down plaque in our blood vessels. Doctors say drinking three cups of green tea each day could be enough to give your brain the boost it needs.

Speaking on his Radio 4 podcast, TV doctor Dr Michael Mosley said: "There is one hot beverage that seems to have the edge especially when it comes to your brain health. It takes a bit of getting used to but that taste is actually the polyphenols in the tea which potentially boast some extra health perks, such as burning more fat when you exercise, boosting your mood and lowering your risk for heart disease and dementia."

Dr Edward Okello has also backed up the green tea enthusiasts. He said: "EGCG acts by boosting the levels acetylcholine, and that translates into improved cognitive function.

"We looked at tea consumption in people over 85 years old over a six-year period, and has shown that tea consumption slows down the decline of cognition over time. But the amount of tea is what is more important, so in our study, we show that at least three cups of tea, as a minimum (a day) would be good for you."

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