London Tube strike June 2022: which TfL underground lines are affected today - how long will RMT strike last?

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Travellers in London have been advised to avoid the Tube as thousands of TfL staff take strike action, closing lines across the city

Travellers in London have been advised to avoid the Tube as thousands of TfL staff take strike action.

Underground lines across the city are being affected by the 6 June walkout, with the transport body warning of station closures and major disruption.

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More than 4,000 members of the RMT union have launched a walkout over cost-saving plans the union says will cost hundreds of jobs.

What lines are affected?

All lines on the London Underground are affected by the strike action.

TfL, which is responsible for the Tube network said that trains will run on some lines but that many stations, especially in central and eastern London will be closed throughout the day while others are open for reduced periods of time.

From early on Monday the Bakerloo, Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Metropolitan, Piccadilly, Victoria and Waterloo & City lines were closed completely, while reduced services were operating on the Central, Jubilee and Northern lines.

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Services on London Overground, Elizabeth line, DLR, London Trams and National Rail are running as normal but are expected to be busier than usual. Some stations on the newly opened Elizabeth line are also closed.

Buses are running as normal but are far busier due to the Tube closure (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)Buses are running as normal but are far busier due to the Tube closure (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
Buses are running as normal but are far busier due to the Tube closure (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images) | Getty Images

Early on Monday morning commuters were already complaining of chaos on the rail network and criticising TfL’s communication around how services were being affected.

When will the strike end?

The strike started at 00.01 on Monday, 6 June and will run for 24 hours.

However, TfL has warned that some stations might still be closed on Tuesday morning and urged travellers to delay their journeys until after 8am and allow more time to complete their journeys.

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There are separate overnight strikes on the Central, Jubilee and Victoria lines which will continue every Friday and Saturday until Sunday 19 June 2022.

Why are TfL staff on strike?

The RMT has said that TFL cost-cutting measures will see the loss of 600 jobs across the Tube network.

TfL said no proposals had been tabled on pensions or terms and conditions, and nobody would lose their jobs due to the proposals it had set out.

As part of previous funding agreements, the Government has required TfL to work towards achieving financial sustainability by April 2023.

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TfL says that part of this will involve not refilling between 500 and 600 posts as they become vacant.

Andy Lord, TfL’s chief operating officer, said: “I’d like to apologise to London for the impact this strike will have on journeys.

“We know it’s going to be damaging to London and the economy, at a time when public transport is playing a crucial role in the capital’s recovery.

“Working with us to find a resolution is the best course of action, avoiding the disruption this strike will cause to Londoners and the economy.”

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The RMT said that, the current proposals would see a reduction in staff numbers and threaten working agreements, alongside an existing “looming threat” to pensions.

General secretary Mick Lynch said: “We are demanding a direct face to face meeting with mayor Sadiq Khan to sort this mess out.

“There’s no point in our union continuing to sit opposite management representatives who have neither the inclination nor the authority to negotiate a settlement, when the power lies with the mayor.”

Are there more strikes planned?

The 6 June action is the only strike currently planned but the RMT has also launched an overtime ban which began on Friday 3 June and will continue until 10 July.

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