Is there a no-fly zone over Ukraine? What did activist Daria Kaleniuk ask Boris Johnson amid Russia bombing

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“You’re coming to Poland, you’re not coming to Kyiv, Prime Minister.”

The director of a Ukrainian anti-corruption body tearfully confronted Boris Johnson making a plea for a no-fly zone over her country and telling him World War Three has “already started”.

Daria Kaleniuk questioned the Prime Minister at a press conference in Warsaw, Poland.

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Ms Kaleniuk, the executive director of the Anti-Corruption Action Centre civil society organisation, which looks to clampdown on political corruption in Ukraine, argued allies from Nato are wrong to rule out a no-fly zone out of a fear of provoking a nuclear war with Vladimir Putin.

Daria Kaleniuk made a plea at a press conference in Warsaw with Boris Johnson for a no-fly zone to be established to protect Ukrainian civilians from Russian bombs.Daria Kaleniuk made a plea at a press conference in Warsaw with Boris Johnson for a no-fly zone to be established to protect Ukrainian civilians from Russian bombs.
Daria Kaleniuk made a plea at a press conference in Warsaw with Boris Johnson for a no-fly zone to be established to protect Ukrainian civilians from Russian bombs. | PA

What did Daria Kaleniuk say to Boris Johnson?

Ms Kaleniuk, who said she is from Kyiv but entered Poland a couple of days ago, also condemned the UK for not hitting Roman Abramovich, the Russian billionaire who owns Chelsea FC, with sanctions.

She said: “You’re coming to Poland, you’re not coming to Kyiv Prime Minister, you’re not coming to Lviv, because you’re afraid.

“Nato is not willing to defend because Nato is afraid of World War Three but it’s already started and it’s Ukrainian children who are there taking the hit,”

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“Ukrainian women and Ukrainian children are in deep fear because of bombs and missiles which are going from the sky. Ukrainian people are desperately asking for the rights to protect our sky, we are asking for a no-fly zone.

“What’s the alternative for the no-fly zone?

“You are talking about more sanctions, Prime Minister, but Roman Abramovich is not sanctioned, he’s in London, his children are not in the bombardments, his children are there in London.”

She said Mr Putin’s children are safe in mansions that have not been seized and, breaking into tears, added: “I don’t see that. I see that my family members, that my team members are saying we are dying, we don’t have anywhere to run.”

Prime Minister Boris Johnson takes a question from  Daria Kaleniuk during a press conference at the British Embassy in Warsaw.Prime Minister Boris Johnson takes a question from  Daria Kaleniuk during a press conference at the British Embassy in Warsaw.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson takes a question from Daria Kaleniuk during a press conference at the British Embassy in Warsaw. | PA

What is a no-fly zone?

It is an exclusion zone put in place over an area in which certain aircrafts are not allowed to fly. They are usually imposed during conflicts in order to stop military aircraft from operating in the area .

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Also known as air exclusion zones, they were first set up in the 1990s

Actions taken to enforce them include surveillance, preemptive strikes and by taking action against planes which violate them.

However air exclusion zones are sometimes used in other contexts such as for major events like the London 2012 Olympics.

What was Boris Johnson’s response?

Mr Johnson directly apologised to Ms Kaleniuk for the “tragedy and suffering” because of the Kremlin’s invasion but ruled out allies enforcing a no-fly zone over Ukraine because of the disastrous consequences that could follow UK forces engaging in combat with Russians.

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Mr Johnson said he welcomed her passionate question and was “glad” she had made it to Poland, saying he was “acutely conscious that there is not enough we can do as the UK Government to help in the way that you want”.

Just as in his conversations with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, Mr Johnson said that “unfortunately the implication of that is the UK would be engaged in shooting down Russian planes, would be engaged in direct combat with Russia – that’s not something we can do”.

“I think the consequences of that would be truly very, very difficult to control,” he added.

Instead, Mr Johnson argued Britain must continue with “tightening the economic noose” around the Putin regime and providing further defensive support to Kyiv.

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“In the mean time, as you rightly say, there is going to be a period of suffering for the people of Ukraine for which Putin alone is responsible,” the Prime Minister continued.

“It will take time, I’m afraid, for us to come through this period. All that we can do in the meantime is help people like your crew and your family to get out, to get to safety.”

But Mr Johnson said he had “no doubt” the international outpouring of sympathy for Ukraine will only grow and that “people will not rest until this injustice is reversed and that Putin not just fails but is seen to have failed in Ukraine”.

“I think the whole international community will work together to ensure that you and your family are able to live in a sovereign and independent Ukraine,” he continued.

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“And I’m sorry it’s going to take time, I’m sorry it’s going to be difficult and I’m sorry for the tragedy and suffering that you’ve experienced but thank you very very much for coming today and asking your question. I think everybody today has really appreciated it.”

Daria Kaleniuk.Daria Kaleniuk.
Daria Kaleniuk. | PA

Why was Boris Johnson in Poland?

Mr Johnson was visiting Poland and Estonia to help show the UK’s support for its eastern Nato allies.

On Tuesday after arriving in Poland he met with Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki.

During the first leg of his visit, in Warsaw, he committed to doing more to allow Ukrainians to come to the UK, with around 200,000 eligible under an expanded route for people to bring family members in.

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He said: “What we are going to do is we are extending the family scheme so that actually very considerable numbers would be eligible … you could be talking about a couple of hundred thousand, maybe more.

“Additionally, we are going to have a humanitarian scheme and then a scheme by which UK companies and citizens can sponsor individual Ukrainians to come to the UK.”

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