What time did Eliud Kipchoge run Berlin Marathon 2022 in? Kenyan athlete breaks own world record

Kenyan athlete takes 30 seconds off his own record from the same race in 2018. Two time Olympic gold medallist wins 13th race of career.

Kenyan runner Eliud Kipchoge has set a new world record marathon time in Berlin, beating the record he set himself in the German capital four years ago.

The 37-year old, who is a two time Olympic gold medalist, took an entire 30 seconds off of the previous record which had stood since 2018.

The time saw him comfortably win the 2022 Berlin Marathon a full four minutes and 49 seconds ahead of countryman Mark Korir who ran home in second place.

Here is the new world record time set by Kipchoge in Berlin and what the Kenyan runner said after the race:

What time did Eliud Kipchoge run the Berlin Marathon 2022 in?

Eliud Kipchoge finished the 2022 Berlin Marathon in a new world record time of 2:01:09.

The previous record, which was set by Kipchoge at the same race in 2018, was 2:01:39.

The win was also the 13th of the 37-year old’s career marathons of which he has ran in 15.

The Kenyan is no stranger to setting records and has previously set the course records in the Tokyo Marathon (2021) and the London Marathon (2019).

His illustrious career has seen him pick up multiple accolades including two Olympic gold medals first at 2016 games in Rio de Janeiro then again at the most recent games in Tokyo.

Berlin Marathon 2022 results

Per NBC Sport, here are the official results (top 10) for the men’s and women’s Berlin Marathon:

Men

  1. Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) — 2:01:09 - New World Record
  2. Mark Korir (KEN) — 2:05:58
  3. Tadu Abate (ETH) — 2:06:28
  4. Andamiak Belihu (ETH) — 2:06:40
  5. Abel Kipchumba (ETH) — 2:06:40
  6. Limenih Getachew (ETH) — 2:07:07
  7. Kenya Sonota (JPN) — 2:07:14
  8. Tatsuya Maruyama (JPN) — 2:07:50
  9. Kento Kikutani (JPN) — 2:07:56
  10. Zablon Chumba (KEN) — 2:08:01

Women

  1. Tigist Assefa (ETH) — 2:15:37
  2. Rosemary Wanjiru (KEN) — 2:18:00
  3. Tigist Abayechew (ETH) — 2:18:03
  4. Workenesh Edesa (ETH) — 2:18:51
  5. Meseret Sisay Gola (ETH) — 2:20:58
  6. Keira D’Amato (USA) — 2:21:48
  7. Rika Kaseda (JPN) — 2:21:55
  8. Ayuko Suzuki (JPN) — 2:22:02
  9. Sayaka Sato (JPN) — 2:22:13
  10. Vibian Chepkirui (KEN) — 2:22:21

Wheelchair Men

  1. Marcel Hug (SUI) — 1:24:56
  2. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) — 1:28:54
  3. David Weir (GBR) — 1:29:02
  4. Jetze Plat (NED) — 1:29:06
  5. Sho Watanabe (JPN) — 1:32:44
  6. Patrick Monahan (IRL) — 1:32:46
  7. Jake Lappin (AUS) — 1:32:50
  8. Kota Hokinoue (JPN) — 1:33:45
  9. Rafael Botello Jimenez (ESP) — 1:36:49
  10. Jordie Madera Jimenez (ESP) — 1:36:50

Wheelchair Women

  1. Catherine Debrunner (SUI) — 1:36:47
  2. Manuela Schar (SUI) — 1:36:50
  3. Susannah Scaroni (USA) — 1:36:51
  4. Merle Menje (GER) — 1:43:34
  5. Aline dos Santos Rocha (BRA) — 1:43:35
  6. Madison de Rozario (BRA) — 1:43:35
  7. Patricia Eachus (SUI) — 1:44:15
  8. Vanessa De Souza (BRA) — 1:48:37
  9. Alexandra Helbling (SUI) — 1:51:47
  10. Natalie Simanowski (GER) — 2:05:09

What did Kipchoge say after breaking the world record?

After his win and new world record in Berlin, the Kenyan was asked if he would attempt a sub-two hour run in Berlin next year.

Per Sky Sports, he said: “Let us plan for another day. I need to celebrate this record and have to realise what happens. Just roll and see what happens.

“There is still more in my legs. I hope the future is still great. My mind is still moving, the body still absorbing the training.”