Drunk Pandas: dizzying optical illusion leaves viewers feeling drunk after image appears to move

The bizarre illusion has left viewers feeling intoxicated as the image appears to be moving

<p>Does the image move when you look at it? (Photo: Reddit/ Eatvaca64)</p>

Does the image move when you look at it? (Photo: Reddit/ Eatvaca64)

A dizzying optical illusion has left viewers feeling baffled after the still image appeared to move.

The bizarre picture was uploaded to social media platform Reddit by a user who posts under the name ‘Eatvaca’, The Sun reports.

Does the image move when you look at it? (Photo: Reddit/ Eatvaca64)

What is the optical illusion?

The strange image depicts eight green columns which look like sticks of bamboo.

The image has been aptly captioned “Drunk Pandas” as it gives the impression that the viewer is intoxicated, as the columns appear to move after staring at it for a while.

The picture becomes even more dizzying if you scroll up and down, with the columns seemingly shaking from side to side.

A confused user commented on the post, saying: “What the f**k have you done you evil person, I have looked at this for 10 minutes now.”

“Why the hell is it moving,” one user asked.

“I literally downloaded this to see if it was a gif... it’s a jpeg... it’s not moving but I see it moving…”, a third said.

Another wrote: ““I- it’s- IT’S MOVING AND I DON’T LIKE IT.”

“I got dizzy just by looking at this for like 5 seconds what the hell,” a fellow user commented.

“Hmmm The bamboos seem to move IDK man I’m imagining stuff”, said another.

“It makes you like hallucinate even more if you scroll up and down with a decent speed,” one user added.

“God damn I’m on phone and scrolling up and down while staring at it MAKES IT WORSE AAAAAAAAA!” another agreed.

Another user pointed out that zooming in on the image makes it clear that the pieces of bamboo are in a straight line, but from a distance the columns appear to move.

What do you see when you look at it?

What other optical illusions are there?

Another optical illusion leaving the internet baffled comes in the form of an abstract pink drawing against a blue background.

The image claims that those who are right-brained will see a fish, while those who are left-brained will see a mermaid.

However, the picture has left people baffled as social media users claim the image clearly shows either a seal or a donkey.

The left side of the brain is more verbal, analytical and orderly than the right side, and is better at things such as reading and writing, whereas the right is said to be more visual and intuitive, and is often described as the “creative” side of the brain.

How we perceive optical Illusions is thought to reveal which side of our brain is more dominant and this is believed to influence what our personality is like.

The theory came about in the 1960s thanks to psychobiologist and Nobel Prize winner Roger W Sperry.

However, recently a two year analysis found that there was no proof that this theory was actually true.

The research, published in 2013, said: “It has been conjectured that individuals may be left-brain dominant or right-brain dominant based on personality and cognitive style, but neuroimaging data has not provided clear evidence whether such phenotypic differences in the strength of left-dominant or right-dominant networks exist.

“Lateralization of brain connections appears to be a local rather than global property of brain networks, and our data are not consistent with a whole-brain phenotype of greater “left-brained” or greater “right-brained” network strength across individuals.”

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