Level 3 cold weather alert: where is Met Office UK cold weather alert in place, meaning - will there be snow?

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Current guidance says there is a 90% probability of severe cold weather, icy conditions and heavy snow

The UK Health and Security Agency has issued a Level 3 Cold Weather Alert for the whole of England, as more sleet and snow is expected across the UK as an Arctic blast of cold weather intensifies.

The agency’s head of extreme events and health protection, Dr Agostinho Sousa, said people should check on vulnerable relatives and told pensioners and anyone with an underlying health condition to heat their home to at least 18C.

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But what exactly does the alert mean, what precautions should you take, and where exactly is it in place? Here is everything you need to know.

What does a Level 3 alert mean?

The Met Office issues cold weather alerts in England during the winter months from November 1 to March 31 in association with the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA).

They give members of the public an advanced warning of weather conditions that could significantly impact your health and well-being.

A Level 3 cold weather alert forewarns “Severe” cold weather events, and is just one step below a Level 4, reserved only for a “National Emergency”.

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Level 3 alerts are put in place when forecasts predict temperatures will drop to 2C or less with the possibility of widespread ice and heavy snow. When such an alert is issued, social and healthcare services are advised to take specific actions to help protect high-risk groups.

(Image: NationalWorld)(Image: NationalWorld)
(Image: NationalWorld) | NationalWorld

How can I keep safe during a Level 3 alert?

To keep well and stay safe during a Level 3 Cold Weather alert it is recommended that you:

  • Stay tuned into the UK forecast.
  • Check daytime room temperature and maintain it at 18 °C (70 °F).
  • Check bedroom night-time temperature and maintain it at 18 °C (65 °F) or warmer.
  • If you have to go out make sure you dress warmly and wear non-slip shoes. Also tell someone where you are going and let them know when you get back. If you have a mobile phone, keep it charged and on you at all times.
  • Keep active.
  • Dress warmly, eat warm food and take warm drinks regularly.
  • Check on those you know are at risk.
  • If you are concerned about your own health or welfare or that of others, alert emergency services.
  • Clear pavements of ice or snow if you are able and if essential.

The above advice is especially prevalent for those who are not mobile, have a long-term illness or are 65 or over. If you are at a higher risk of cold-related illness or falls, you should avoid exposing yourself to cold or icy outdoor conditions.

If you want more information about how cold weather can affect your health, please visit www.nhs.uk. If you are concerned about your health or somebody you care for, advice can be obtained from www.nhs.uk/winterhealth, NHS 111 or your local pharmacist.

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Where is the latest Level 3 Cold Weather in place?

Further sleet and snow are anticipated across the UK as an Arctic blast of cold weather intensifies. This has prompted the UK Health and Security Agency to issue a Level 3 Cold Weather Alert for the entirety of England.

The current guidance for the alert says there is a 90% probability of severe cold weather, icy conditions and heavy snow between 9am on Wednesday 8 March and 9am on Monday 13 March in parts of England.

Alerts can be altered, either by being lengthened, shortened or cancelled completely in light of updated forecasts and predictions. However, any updates are only made with the daily issuing of necessary alerts, which occurs around 9am.

That means that once an alert is issued, it will remain in place for at least 24 hours, until the next daily update.

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