Bella Ramsey: Trans Day of Visibility post explained - is Last of Us star non binary?

Ramsey, who plays Ellie on the hit HBO show The Last of Us, took to social media to mark Trans Day of Visibility
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The Last of Us and Game of Thrones star Bella Ramsey took to social media to wish a happy Trans Day of Visibility to her younger self. Ramsey identifies as non-binary, and in a recent interview with GQ Magazine, she said that she doesn’t mind what pronouns are used for her, and opted to use she/her for the story - this article will also therefore be using she/her pronouns.

For reference, LGBTQ+ charity Stonewall defines non-binary as “an umbrella term for people whose gender identity doesn’t sit comfortably with “man” or “woman”. Non-binary identities are varied and can include people who identify with some aspect of binary identities, while others reject them entirely.”

While some non-binary people prefer the use of they/them pronouns, not all non-binary people use those pronouns exclusively. Some might use she/her or he/him pronouns (or a combination of both, or something else entirely), but they are still non-binary regardless of their pronouns.

What did Bella Ramsey say on Twitter?

Ramsey celebrated Trans Day of Visibility by posting a picture of her younger self on Twitter, writing in the caption: “Happy TDOV to this little dude! I didn’t know the word non-binary in this picture. But I knew what it meant. Inherently. Because I always was, and always will be. Lotsa love to all of my trans, enby and gender funky friends #TransDayOfVisibility”

Trans Day of Visibility is an annual day which celebrates trans and non-binary people, and raises awareness of the discrimination that they face. Trans Day Of Visibility takes place on 31 March.

The day was founded by transgender activist Rachel Crandall, from Michigan, in 2009 in response to the fact that the only recognition that transgender people really got was on Remembrance Day - a day which mourns the murders of transgender people, with no days or events that acknowledge or celebrate the living.

Speaking with Pride Source in 2009, Crandall said: “I went on Facebook and I was thinking… whenever I hear about our community, it seems to be from Remembrance Day which is always so negative because it’s about people who were killed.

“So one night I couldn’t sleep and I decided why don’t I try to do something about that.”

While the first Trans Day of Visibility was held in 2009 and has since been celebrated around the world in the following years.

Is Bella Ramsey non-binary?

In a New York Times profile released in January earlier this year, Ramsey revealed that she self-identifies as non-binary.

She said: “I guess my gender has always been very fluid. Someone would call me “she” or “her” and I wouldn’t think about it, but I knew that if someone called me “he”, it would be exciting.”

She added: “I’m very much just a person. Being gendered isn’t something that I particularly like, but in terms of pronouns, I really couldn’t care less.”

Bella Ramsey attends the Newport Beach Film Festival UK Honours 2023 at The Londoner Hotel on February 16, 2023 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)Bella Ramsey attends the Newport Beach Film Festival UK Honours 2023 at The Londoner Hotel on February 16, 2023 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)
Bella Ramsey attends the Newport Beach Film Festival UK Honours 2023 at The Londoner Hotel on February 16, 2023 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)

Ramsey also said in a GQ Magazine interview that she wore a chest binder for “90%” of filming for The Last of Us, something which she acknowledged “probably isn’t healthy, please bind safely”, as it allowed her to focus better whilst shooting.

She also said that her The Last of Us co-star Pedro Pascal, whose sister is transgender, was “super supportive” of her, adding that the two of them would have lots of conversations regarding gender and sexuality.

“They weren’t always deep: they could be funny and humorous, the whole spectrum. We were just very honest and open with each other,” she said.

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