I'm A Celeb: Nigel Farage challenged on infamous Brexit 'Breaking Point' poster by First Dates' Fred Sirieix

First Dates star Fred Sirieix and former Ukip and Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage clashed in camp when the topic of politics came up
First Dates star Fred Sirieix and former politician Nigel Farage clashed in the I'm A Celeb jungle, with Fred taking Nigel to task for his hand in the Brexit process. (Credit: ITV)First Dates star Fred Sirieix and former politician Nigel Farage clashed in the I'm A Celeb jungle, with Fred taking Nigel to task for his hand in the Brexit process. (Credit: ITV)
First Dates star Fred Sirieix and former politician Nigel Farage clashed in the I'm A Celeb jungle, with Fred taking Nigel to task for his hand in the Brexit process. (Credit: ITV)

First Dates star Fred Sirieix branded Nigel Farage's Brexit campaign "shameful" as the two clashed over politics in the I'm A Celeb jungle.

In scenes aired last night (Monday 20 November), viewers watched as the camp sat down and began discussing politics. Farage admitted that he had expected the moment to come, being such a divisive figure in the political world.

While discussing the 'real' Boris Johnson with campmates Josie Gibson and Danielle Harold, with Farage describing him as "one of the most disorganised human beings that possibly ever lived", the topic of conversation quickly turned to the elephant in the room.

Fred then asked the former Brexit Party and UKIP leader: “What’s the benefit of Brexit then? If you are an average person from Britain, what’s the benefit?” Nigel responded: “To know that we’re independent, we stand on our own two feet in the world.”

However, Fred made his feelings about the topic clear, telling him: “Brexit was about immigration, I remember your poster. I thought it was shameful what you did Nigel. Shameful.”

The much-criticised poster used by UKIP in the party's Brexit campaign showed a line of non-white refugees and migrants forming a queue in Slovenia with the words 'Breaking Point' over the top. (Credit: Getty Images)The much-criticised poster used by UKIP in the party's Brexit campaign showed a line of non-white refugees and migrants forming a queue in Slovenia with the words 'Breaking Point' over the top. (Credit: Getty Images)
The much-criticised poster used by UKIP in the party's Brexit campaign showed a line of non-white refugees and migrants forming a queue in Slovenia with the words 'Breaking Point' over the top. (Credit: Getty Images)

Farage and Ukip came under fire during the Brexit campaign in 2016 after the use of a now-infamous poster which showed a queue of non-white migrants and refugees in Slovenia with the words 'Breaking Point' over it. The poster caused a huge uproar, with accusations that it was attempting to incite racial hatred, with the poster even reported to the police for the same reasons. Former Chancellor George Osbourne was among those to criticise the poster, saying that it was "disgusting" and "vile" and had "echoes" of the 1930s.

Nigel attempted to defend the use of the poster, telling Fred: “Sadly, sadly it was absolutely true. It was a poster showing mass young men moving illegally across borders.”

However, the First Dates star told his campmate that the poster was about "demonising migrants". Nigel retorted: “No it wasn’t. In your view it was, but it wasn’t.” However Fred replied: “It’s not only just my view."

Later in the conversation, Fred also told Nigel that he believed that the average UK citizen had "lost out because of what you've done", to Nigel's instance that there was no losing out. He said: “Brexit is about one thing and one thing only; being self-governing. We’re in charge. We can get it right, we can make an absolute mess of it but we’re in charge and the people who make those decisions we can hire and fire at elections where they have real power.”

In the Bush Telegraph after the conversation, Fred said: “Look, Nigel Farage is in the jungle with me. We’re bound to have this conversation. At the end of the day nothing is going to change, Nigel believes what he believes, I believe what I believe. It was only a matter of time.”

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